PHASE 4 : INTEGRATION

 

INTRODUCTION

 

During Phase 4, sub-programme proposals, which were presented in the preceding phase, have to be harmonized in terms of contents, location and timing in order to achieve consolidated integrated programmes for the Greater Tzaneen Municipality.

 

The major output for Phase 4 is an INTEGRATION OF PLANS AND PROGRAMMES which includes:

 

  1. Integrated Transport Plan

 

  1. Integrated Waste Management Plan

 

  1. Water Sector Plan

 

  1. An Integrated Spatial Development Framework, which proposes a broad spatial development for the municipal area and demonstrates compliance of the Greater Tzaneen IDP with spatial principles and strategies;

 

  1. A Five Year Financial Plan and Five Year Capital Investment Plan;

 

  1. An Integrated Poverty Reduction/Gender Equity Programme, which demonstrates compliance of the Greater Tzaneen IDP with policy guidelines related to poverty and gender specific monitoring;

 

  1. An Integrated Environmental Programme which demonstrates compliance of the IDP with environmental policies and contributes towards environmental impact monitoring through an awareness of legislative requirements for environmental impact assessment;

 

  1. An Integrated Local Economic Development (LED) Programme which provides an overview of measures to promote economic development and employment generation within the Greater Tzaneen Municipal Area;

 

  1. An Integrated HIV/AIDS Programme which illustrates the extent of the epidemic and the proposed efforts and actions of the municipality to address the problem;

 

  1. A Disaster Management Plan which outlines the preparedness of the municipality;

 

  1. An Integrated Institutional Programme which spells out the management reforms and organizational arrangements the municipality intends implementing in order to achieve the development goals of the IDP;  and

 

  1. An Integrated Monitoring and Performance Management System, comprising monitoring, performance measurements, review and reporting

 

  1. National And Provincial Plans For 2005/2006

 

A. INTEGRATED TRANSPORT PLAN

 

LEGISLATION / POLICY PRESCRIPTION

 

1.             THE NATIONAL LAND TRANSPORT TRANSITION ACT 22 OF 2000

 

-                      Contains the statutory requirements relating to various planning elements.

-                      The requirements of this Act relates to various aspects of transport planning viz: -

·                     strategic objectives to be achieved through planning

·                     contents of any particular plan

·                     planning process or procedures

·                     planning programme

·                     publication of plans

·                     integration of planning

·                     public participation

·                     responsibility for planning

 

2.             WHITE PAPER ON NATIONAL TRANSPORT POLICY

 

-                      The Land Passenger section of the White Paper on National Transport Policy consists of two main parts namely:

·                     a description of the strategic objectives of government for land transport and;

·                     the development and description of land transport policy.

 

3.             MOVING SOUTH AFRICA ACTION AGENDA

 

-                      Followed on the 1996 White Paper on National Transport Policy with the focus shifting more to the customer and to the concept of differentiated customers with a diverse range of needs viz:

·                     the need for sustainability

·                     level of action

·                     steps to realize the integrated vision

·                     strategic principles to guide implementation

 

The White Paper together with the Moving South Africa Action Agenda are the cornerstones of the National Land Transport Transition Act 22 of 2000.

 

          ANALYSIS / STATUS QUO

The Greater Tzaneen Municipality forms part of the Mopani District Municipality together with the following Municipalities

-                      Greater Letaba

-                      Greater Giyani and

-                      Ba-Phalaborwa

 

As roads connect the above-mentioned Municipalities it is of great importance that the Transport Plans of all the above mentioned municipalities be integrated with that of Greater Tzaneen Municipality.

 

THE TRANSPORT SYSTEM CONSISTS OF FOUR BASIC ELEMENTS NAMELY:

Ø             Modes of Transport

Ø             Infrastructure

Ø             Users of the system

Ø             Planning, Implementation, Monitoring and Maintenance of the system.

Ø            MODES OF TRANSPORT

 

Modes of transport include:

ØA.         Private and public vehicles

ØB.         Buses and taxis

ØC.         Pedestrians, motorcycles, bicycles etc

ØD.         Delivery and emergency vehicles

 

 

 

ØA.         PRIVATE/ PUBLIC VEHICLES

 

A.i            57 000 Private vehicles were registered at the Municipality as per 25/08/2004 statistics.    

A.ii           No Passenger Train Transport is presently functioning from Tzaneen station to other areas within Greater Tzaneen Municipality area.

A.iii           Donkey-cart Transport is often used in rural areas. A survey is to be conducted as to the number of such mode of transport

 

 

 

 

ØB.         BUSES AND TAXI’S

 

B.1           Buses and Taxi’s forms a large component of the Public Transport, carrying      commuters from villages and suburbs into Tzaneen town and surrounding      municipalities.

 

                i               Bus companies carry school children from the above areas into Tzaneen schools are

                                -               Netshitudi Bus Service owing 8 Buses

                                -               Machris Bus Service - 1 Bus

                                -               Truslea Bus Service with 4 Buses

                                -               Fouché Bus Service with 3 Buses

 

 

 

ii               Bus companies carrying commuters for long and short distances to Greater Tzaneen Municipality are:

                                -               Great North Bus Services

                                -               RBS (former Risaba Bus Service)

                                -               Translux

                                -               MBS

               

                Public Transport routes used by Buses and Taxis from Ward 1 to Ward 33:

 

Tzaneen to Maponya                              -               Vol 255 passengers

Tzaneen to Khujwana                             -               Vol 170 passengers

Tzaneen to Lenyenye                              -               Vol 208 passengers

Tzaneen to Sunnyside                             -               Vol 189 passengers

Tzaneen to Moime                                  -               Vol 255 passengers

Tzaneen to Mogoboya                            -               Vol 85 passengers

Tzaneen to Maake                                  -               Vol 170 passengers

Tzaneen to Shiluvane                              -               Vol 170 passengers

Tzaneen to Mogapeng                            -               Vol 85 passengers

Tzaneen to Pharare                                -               Vol 85      passengers

Tzaneen to Masoma                               -               Vol 85 passengers

Tzaneen to Julesburg                              -               Vol 85 passengers

Tzaneen to Sedan                                    -               Vol 85 passengers

Tzaneen to Zangoma                              -               Vol 85 passengers

Tzaneen to Shikwambane                       -               Vol 85 passengers

Tzaneen to Petanenye                            -               Vol 85 passengers

Tzaneen to Burgersdorp                         -               Vol 104 passengers

Tzaneen to Mokwakwaile                        -               Vol 255 passengers

Tzaneen to Modjadji                                -               Vol 170 passengers

Tzaneen to Medingeng                           -               Vol 85 passengers

Tzaneen to Madumane                           -               Vol 255 passengers

Tzaneen to Thapane                               -               Vol 85 passengers

Tzaneen to Kubjane                                -               Vol 85 passengers

Tzaneen to Motupa                                 -               Vol 85 passengers

Tzaneen to Xihoko                                  -               Vol 85 passengers

Tzaneen to Wally                                     -               Vol 85 passengers

Tzaneen to Mandlakazi                           -               Vol 85 passengers

Nkowankowa to Xihoko                           -               Vol 170 passengers

Nkowankowa to Manolakazi                    -               Vol 85 passengers

Nkowankowa to Maponya                       -               Vol 85 passengers

Nkowankowa to Mlati                              -               Vol 85 passengers

Nkowankowa to Shiluvane                      -               Vol 85 passengers

Petanenge to Nkowankowa                    -               Vol 85 passengers

Tzaneen to Lenyenye                              -               Vol 85 passengers

Tzaneen to Muhlabe cross                      -               Vol 85 passengers

Tzaneen to Dan Village                            -               Vol 85 passengers

 


 

B.2           Taxi Associations operating within and outside Greater Tzaneen Municipality are:

 

Boyne

Pusela

Nkowankowa

Nwamitwa

Bolobedu (Buta)

Bakgaga

The oaks and

Letaba

               

 

New Chairpersons for this Association will be elected during the week of 3-6 May 2005

 

                Maxi Taxi's

No Maxi Taxi’s services are available from Tzaneen CBD to various residential areas like Aqua Park, Arbor Park, Flora Park and Industrial areas. 

 

At present only illegal Taxi’s operate from CBD to Flora Park and Industrial area. Consultation was done with Provincial Department Transport (Mopani District) about licencing Maxi Taxi's.

B.3          BUSES AND TAXI’S - Main Lines

Ba-Phalaborwa to Tzaneen:

±1530 passengers per week use buses and taxi’s.

 

                Translux Bus Services

                2 Buses per day ± vol 85 per single trip.  (± 1190 passengers per week.)

 

                TAXI’s Tzaneen to Gauteng (PretoriaJohannesburg)

± 1190 passengers by Taxis (Pusela Taxi Association) per week, Depending on the number of trips undertaken.

               

TAXI RANK INFORMATION WITHIN GREATER TZANEEN MUNICIPALITY 

 

-               Burgersdorp Taxi Rank

This Taxi Rank is situated in Burgersdorp on road reserve along the R36 Tzaneen Lydenburg Road.  It is an informal Taxi Rank and has no facilities for commuters e.g. Shelter, Toilets, etc.  It operates from the site as a starting point and has several destination points: Julesburg via Ofcolaco; Nkowankowa and Tzaneen via Bridgeway on the R36 road to Tzaneen; The taxi rank is busy during morning and off-peak periods.  The most utilized route by the taxis s the R36 TRL.

 

-               Gabaza Taxi Rank

Gabaza Taxi Rank is situated in Gabaza opposite Burgersdorp Taxi Rank across the R36 tarred road.  It is an informal taxi rank on road reserve.  It is operating from the site as a starting point to Letsitele via Mafarana. 

 

-               Lenyenye Taxi Rank

Lenyenye Taxi Rank is situated at the entrance to the town opposite the garage.  It is an informal taxi rank with destinations such as Tzaneen, Phalaborwa and Metz. 

               

                Taxi's also load/off load commuters informally at the CBD of the town.

 

-               Leolo Taxi Rank

Leolo Taxi Rank is situated in Leolo Settlement.  It is an informal taxi rank on road reserve sharing with buses.  It serves the community traveling from and to Lenyenye via Rakoma.

 

-               Lephephane Taxi Rank

It is an informal taxi rank in Lephepane near the market place on the road reserve.  There are facilities available.

 

 

-               Letsitele Taxi Rank

Letsitele Taxi Rank is situated in Letsitele CBD area.  It is a formal taxi rank occupying an area of about 475m².  There are 7 platforms without shelters for loading purposes.  There is an office and toilets that are provided and maintained by Greater Tzaneen Municipality.  There is also an informal car wash some 150m away which is utilized by taxi drivers to wash their taxis.  

 

-               Letaba Cross Taxi Rank

It is a very informal taxi rank situated near the intersection between Roads D673 and R36 on the Lydenburg/Tzaneen road.  It aims to helping people who reside near Bindzulani shopping centre, Dan and Lusaka Settlements.  It is busy early in the morning as people are going to Tzaneen for work and slow-downs during off-peak periods and almost no action during afternoon peak period.  There are no facilities at this taxi rank.

 

-               Letaba Hospital (E) Taxi Rank

It is an informal taxi rank opposite Letaba Special School and Letaba Hospital on road reserve D673.  This taxi rank is aimed at serving people from Mamitwa to Letaba Hospital and vice versa.  It is not a busy taxi rank.  There are no facilities.

 

-               Letaba Hospital (W) Taxi Rank

It is an informal taxi rank at the entrance of Letaba Hospital utilizing the public parking area meant for visitors to the hospital.  The area is paved and has 30 demarcated parking bays.  This taxi rank is aimed to serve people coming to the hospital to Nkowankowa, Gabaza and Burgersdorp via Bridgeway.  The most utilized route from this taxi rank is road D673 and R36.

 

 

-               Mafarana Taxi Rank

It is an informal taxi rank at the entrance of Mafarana on road reserve at an intersection of roads D8 and MLB TRL/NBS TRL.  There are no facilities available.  It serves people from Mafarana to several destinations like Mulati, Bonn, Sedan and Letsitele.  The taxis from this taxi rank utilizes mostly road D8 to Letsitele CBD area.

 

-               Mamitwa Taxi Rank

This taxi rank is situated in Mamitwa near the Mamitwa Head Kraal.  It is an informal taxi rank on the road reserve from Mamitwa to Mandlakazi.  There are no facilities except the pit-latrines. It is aimed at serving people from Mamitwa to Mokgwathi via Shihoko, Thapane and Tzaneen.  The most utilized route by taxis from this rank is the D3247/D1292/P43 to Tzaneen.

 

-               Madumane Taxi Rank

Madumane is an informal taxi rank situated in Madumane on the road splitting to Morapalala, Mohokgo Block 6 and Pakong.  There are no facilities at all.  It is aimed at serving people from the area to Tzaneen via Mutupa/Relela areas.  The taxi rank is busy during morning peak and off-peak period.

 

 

-               Moime Taxi Rank

It is an informal taxi rank at the South entrance of Moime Village.  It is an on street taxi rank and without facilities.  Is aimed at taking people from Moime via Bridgeway to town on the road R36/P17.  The taxi rank is busy during morning and off peak periods.

 

-               Mokgwathi Taxi Rank

Mokgwathi is another informal taxi rank at Mokgwathi at the T-Junction of the road from Merekome and D319.  There are no facilities.  It is aimed at taking people from the village traveling to town via Merekome to Tzaneen and people traveling to Mamitwa via Shihoko, Hlohlokwe via Mawa.

 

 -              Motupa/Relela Taxi Rank

Motupa/Relela taxi rank is an informal taxi rank on the road reserve at Mutupa Village.  There are no facilities.  It is aimed at people from the area to Tzaneen and vice-versa.  It is very busy during the morning and the off-peak periods.  Taxis from this taxi rank utilize the road D1350 to Tzaneen and back.

 

-               Nkambako Taxi Rank

Nkambako taxi rank is situated at Nkambako Risaba junction on the road reserve.  It is an informal taxi rank and there are no facilities.  Taxis from this taxi rank are destining to Mamitwa, Letsitele, Tzaneen and Giyani.  The most utilized route from the taxi rank is the D1267 to Giyani, Letsitele and Tzaneen via Tarentaal.

 

-               Nkowankowa Taxi Rank

The taxi rank is on Site 215A, Bankuna Street. The area has integrated facilites for hawkers and taxis.

 

The taxi rank is busy during mornings and afternoon peak hours when commuters travel to and from work and has several destinations namely; Tzaneen, Phalaborwa, Burgersdorp, Mamitwa, Letsitele, Petanenge, Letaba Hospital and Giyani.

 

The loading-off loading area for taxi's has been clearly marked, but shelter for taxis, and a waiting/sitting area for commuters have not been provided.

 

-               Nwamahori Taxi Rank

Nwamahori is an informal taxi rank situated in Khujwana.  It is an on street type of taxi rank but has got a big area which is going to be used for the taxi rank in future next to the road near the Peace Makers Football Club Soccer Field.  It is targeted for people mainly from Khujwana traveling to Tzaneen on R36/P17 road.  There are no facilities.

 

 

-               Petanenge Taxi Rank

Petanenge taxi rank is an informal taxi rank on the entrance of Petanenge coming from Nkowankowa side under the marula tree.  It is not a busy taxi rank.  It is aimed at people from the village traveling to Nkowankowa and to Tzaneen via Mhlava and Sasekani on R36 road.

 

-               Rita 1 Taxi Rank

It is an informal taxi rank on road reserve on the turn off to C.N. Phatudi road from R36 road.  It is a very busy taxi rank especially during morning peak hours.  The taxi rank stops operating from area at 15:00 as all the taxis rush to Sanlam Centre taxi rank in Tzaneen to take people from town to the homes.  There are no facilities at all.  At night some of the taxi uses the garage opposite the taxi rank as a holding area.  The most utilized road from this taxi rank is the R36 to Tzaneen.

 

-               Rita 2 Taxi Rank

It is an informal taxi rank at a turn off to Letsitele via Lefaro/Zangoma from the R36 road.  It is an on street type of taxi rank aimed at people traveling to Letsitele via Lefara and Zangoma on road D3766.  It is not a busy taxi rank.  There are no facilities at all.

 

 -              Thapane Taxi Rank

It is an informal taxi rank on the road reserve.  There are no facilities at this taxi rank.  It is aimed at people traveling from the village and Muruji area traveling to Tzaneen using the Deerpark road on D978.  The taxi rank is busy during morning peak and off peak period.  The most utilized route from the taxi rank is the D978 to Tzaneen.

 

-               Tzaneen Crossing (Old Sanlam Centre) Taxi Rank

This taxi rank was established in toto and hawkers esplanades installed with full infrastructure by the developers of the Centre at their costs of R2mil.

 

It is a formal taxi rank situated at to Sanlam Centre shopping area occupying an area of about 3934m².  There are 11 loading platforms with shelters which are still not enough as the taxi rank is extremely busy.  The undercover seats at he shelters are inadequate.  There are toilets inside the shopping centre for public use.

 

The taxi rank is very busy even at of- peak period and until lete afternoons.  most utilized route is P17/R36 with destinations such as Nkowankowa, Dan, Lusaka, Mokgolobotho, Khujwana, Lephephane, Lenyenye, Thickeyline, etc.

 

-               Tzaneen Pick ‘n Pay Taxi Rank

It is a formal taxi rank situated at Tzaneng Mall (Pick ‘n Pay) occupying an area of  ±4763m².  There are two separate loading areas in the taxi rank.  The one loading area is for local destine and the other for far distances e.g. Boyne, Polokwane, Johannesburg, Giyani, Pretoria, etc.  There are 14 loading platforms combined in the taxi rank.  The local one has several destinations like Duiwelskloof, Kgapane, Motupa/Relela, Thapane, Mamitwa, Acornhoek, etc.  This part of the taxi rank is very busy during the off peak period and the afternoon peak period.  The most utilized route by taxis from this rank is the D978 via Deerpark followed by P43/3 via D1292 to Mamitwa.

 

The far destine part of the taxi rank is busy from morning peak until 16:00 as a transfer station.  The most utilized route from this part of the taxi rank is the D528 and P17 roads via George’s Valley and Makgoebaskloof to Polokwane respectively.

 


 

CAPACITY UTILISATION OF TAXI RANKS

 

(As per Khanyisa Consultants for Mopani Municipality)

 

Facility Code

Rank Description

Utilisation (%)

AM Peak

MID Peak

PM Peak

L-F0001M

Burgersdorp Taxi Rank

1316.7

937.5

650

L-F0002M

Gabaza Taxi Rank

83.33

181.25

125

L-F0003M

Lenyenye Taxi Rank

783.3

675

141.7

L-F0004M

Leolo Taxi Rank

200

206.3

116.6

L-F0005M

Letsitele Taxi Rank

38

68.6

70.3

L-F0006M

Letaba Cross Taxi Rank

166.7

106.3

0

L-F0007M

Lephepane Taxi Rank

0

0

0

L-F0008M

Letaba Hospital East Taxi Rank

158.3

406.3

50

L-F0009M

Letaba Hospital West Taxi Rank

300

812.5

116.7

L-F0010M

Mafarana Taxi Rank

100

56.3

8.3

L-F0011M

Mamitwa Taxi Rank

132.5

1206.5

575

L-F0012M

Madumane Taxi Rank

166.7

137.5

91.6

L-F0013M

Moime Taxi Rank

258.3

206.5

108.3

L-F0014M

Mokgwathi Taxi Rank

333.3

131.5

25

L-F0015M

Motupa / Relela Taxi Rank

1675

1375

783.3

L-F0016M

Nkambako Taxi Rank

325

137.5

58.3

L-F0017M

Nkowankowa Taxi Rank

189.5

236.9

56.1

L-F0018M

Nwamahori Taxi Rank

233.3

243.7

266.6

L-F0019M

Petanenge Taxi Rank

100

100

100

L-F0020M

Rita 1 Taxi Rank

766.8

135.3

108.4

L-F0021M

Rita 2 Taxi Rank

100

125

108.3

L-F0022M

Thapane Taxi Rank

541.6

256.2

116.6

L-F0023M

Tzaneen Pick ‘n Pay Taxi Rank

118.0

123.9

91.5

L-F0024M

Tzaneen Crossing

(Old Sanlam Centre Taxi Rank)

27.8

141

68.3


 

Ø                 INFRASTRUCTURE

 

The four main roads lead into Greater Tzaneen Municipality are declared National Roads maintained by the National Road Agency viz:

 

·                     Lydenburg road 

·                     Gravelotte – Ba-Phalaborwa road

·                     Magoebaskloof – Greater Letaba Road 

·                     Georges Valley road.

 

These roads are tarred and upgraded during 2001 – 2002.   Lydenburg road carries a large volume of Traffic, especially during peak hours and cannot cope with such volumes.  A total number of 517 accidents were reported during 2003-2004

 

 

Ø            USERS OF THE SYSTEM.

 

*               Private road users - 57 000 private vehicles registered in Greater Tzaneen Municipality together with other vehicles from outside areas passing through Greater Tzaneen Municipality and other visiting.

*               Pedestrians - on sidewalks for shopping and other commitments.

*               Hawkers - also on sidewalks, hawker esplanades and demarcated areas for hawking.

*               Public transport: - buses and taxis carrying commuters into and out of Tzaneen.

*               The transportation of produce by farmers, sawmills, quarry/mining transport etc

 

 

 

C.            MOTORCYCLES, BICYCLES AND PEDESTRIANS also form part of our traffic. Pedestrian related accidents raise fatality rates to undesired levels.

 

D.            DELIVERY & EMERGENCY TRANSPORT:

                D.1          DELIVERY TRANSPORT:

                *               Courier services      -               Spoed Vervoer

                                                                                -               Budget

                                                                                -               X.P.S

                                                                                -               Sun Couriers

                                                                                -               Capricon Couriers

                                                                                -               D.H.L Couriers

                                                                                -               E.P.X Couriers

                                                                                -               C.C.T. Couriers

                                                                                -               Fleat Rent

                                                                                -               Y2k Services

 

*               Farmers                                  -               C.P. Minnaar                           30 trucks

                                                                -               Kobus Minnaar                        45 trucks

                                                                -               Premium Trucking   16 trucks

                                                                -               Van Rooyen Machinery           2 trucks for abnormal loads

 

*               Quarry (mining) and sand transport

                                                                -               Geldenhuys Transport

                                                                -               Letaba Bricks

 

 

                *               Tanker Services (Transporting of Hazardous substances)

Local Depots:                          BP Depot, Shell, NPS Excell, Polox, DED Distributors,

                                                Bosbok Gas, Gasman, B & F Distributors,

                                                Bosbok oil, Stuarts Transport, Afrox, and Mabunda blasting.

 

*               Sawmills                 

                Letaba Sawmill                        -               3 trucks (extra heavy)

                Schoeman Sawmill                  -               2 trucks (extra heavy)

Visagie Sawmill                        -               1 truck     (extra heavy)          

Northern Timbers                    -               10 trucks (extra heavy)

 

                *               Transportation of Hazardous substances

Transportation of hazardous substances into and via Greater Tzaneen Municipality is not regulated at present.  Vehicles from local fuel depots use any road to pass through Greater Tzaneen Municipality, which is a dangerous practice to life.

 

 

D.2          EMERGENCY SERVICES

 

                *               Emergency Services:

                                Mopani District Municipal is in possession of the following:

 

                                1.             Disaster management unit (bus)            

                                2.             Fire Department -   1 Command vehicle

                                                                                 -              4 fire fighting trucks

                                                                                 -              4 LDV vehicles

                                                                                 -              1 Rubber duck

                                                                                 -              3 Grass fire fighting vehicles

                                                                                 -              1 Fire prevention vehicles

                                -               Rescue services-     2 vehicles

                                -               Response unit         -              1 LDV

                                -               Advance support     -               1 LDV

                               

                *               Ambulances            

                                -               Private ambulance companies

                                                =              NPR

                                                =              Zambi 2 ambulances

 

 

                                -               Government Ambulances

                                                =              6 Ambulances

                                                =              5 Buses and

                                                =              1 truck

                               

                                    Greater Tzaneen Municipality  

                                    -           Traffic      9 vehicles comprising of

                                                =              7 sedan (marked) and

                                                =              2 LDV (marked)

 

Ø            IMPLEMENTATION, MONITORING & MAINTENANCE

 

                Responsible Stakeholders:

                Mopani District Municipality, Greater Tzaneen Transport Forum, Developers, National Government, Provincial Government, consulting engineers, town planners, community, police and traffic police together with landscape architects.

 

            PRIVATE/PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

 

The Transport Forum was established within the Greater Tzaneen Municipality to ensure a stage for public participation. Attendance of such Forum meetings is not yet fully participated but progress is made to draw community awareness.

            PRELIMINARY PRIORITIES

 

1.             -               Public Participation needs to be fully participative and maintained so as to serve as a platform for all transport stakeholders to participate in transport related issue, to unite the transport industry, monitor transport needs and monitor the implementation of measures to meet these needs by means of:

                -               Being part of the planning and operational process

                -               Being part of the process for making policy and drafting legislation

                -               Ensuring peace and stability in the area by means of conflict resolution.

                -               Improving transport in general

                -               Providing economic assistance

                -               Ensuring safe road conditions by enforcing adherence to traffic rules and regulations.

 

2.             Objectives

2.1           To improve transport infrastructure, facilities and services within Greater Tzaneen Municipality within a 5 year period.

2.2           To democratize decision – making progess through consultation and public participation e.g. Transport Forum.

2.3           To control and divert transportation of hazardous chemicals within Greater Tzaneen Municipality residential areas and CBD

2.4           To alleviate poverty through the application of local employment development (LED).

 

 

Reporting Level

Description.

 

 

1.   LEVEL OF SERVICE.

a) A full kerbbside collection service are rendered to all communities in the following suburbs of Greater Tzaneen Municipality, which represents only 11% of all households. All general and bio-hazardous waste are removed from viz:  Tzaneen, Nkowankowa, Lenyenye, Letsitele, Haenertsburg [ at present  300 000m3 ]

2.    BACKLOGS.

a)0% of households in the total rural areas, representing ±80034 households.                                                                                              b)The cost to address the service in full with immediate effect, will be        approximately R40,000,000-00 for all 125 villages. 

        3.    STAFF COMPONENTS.

a) The jurisdiction area is divided by the main roads from Politsi via Tzaneen, Tarentaalrand, Letsitele and Trichardtsdal, in a Northern and Southern service region.

4.    WASTE MINIMIZATION.

a) The following production of refuse exists in the GTM area, resulting in a life-span of ± 20 years.

  * Volumes generated = 300 000 m 3 p.a.

  *  Capacity of the Landfill = 1,600,000m³

  *  Compaction = 5:1

b) The landfill site is presently utilized as a Regional landfill receiving solid waste from Tzaneen and Greater Letaba.[Modjadjiskloof.]

c) Presently all organic waste (garden) are treated at the composting site adjacent to the landfill site. [ Presently _+ 30 000m3

5.   LITTER PICKING. (MAIN ROADS & STREETS)

a)All streets & main roads are cleaned on a regular and period schedule from all debris and solid waste.[ 24 000 m3 p.a. ]

6.   RECYCLING.

a) Recycling takes place at the source of origin and are removed by private   enterprise from industrial and business premises. [31 000m`3 p.a. ]

        b) Recycling at  the Tzaneen Landfill [ 16 800 m3 p.a.]

7.   THE SERVICES MUST BE EXTENDED TO INCLUDE:

                a) ± 125 Villages of another 80034 residential stands, which are situ

                 ated within the jurisdiction area of G.T.M.

                b) The mandate of GTM is to:

                     i) Provide all households with a basic removal service. 

 

 

1.Overview of the Waste Management Service.

 

 

 

 

2. Description of the Solid Waste Management function which are administered as follows.

 

 

 

 

 

1.   REMOVAL SERVICES:

a)LEVEL OF SERVICE.

i) A full curbside collection service are rendered to all communities in the following suburbs of Greater Tzaneen Municipality, which represents only 11% of all households ALL general and bio-hazardous waste are removed viz:  Tzaneen, Nkowankowa, Lenyenye, Letsitele, Haenertsburg

b) BACKLOGS.

i) 0% of households in the total rural areas, representing ±80034 households, receive a basic service.  Two (2) x trial projects are however at present undertaken in rural areas which failed due to the lack of cooperation with Prov & Gov departments and the lack of manpower, financial & infrastructural support.  

ii) The cost to address the service in full with immediate effect will be approximately R40, 000,000-00 for all 125 villages. 

2.    LITTER PICKING/STREET CLEANSING.

a) All streets and main roads are cleaned on a regular and period schedule from all debris and solid waste [24 000 m`3 p.a.]

 3.    PUBLIC OFF LOADING FACILITIES/LANDFIll.

              a) 1x Regional landfill, 4 km. from Tzaneen.[ 5xha in size.]                                                       

b) Fully permitted from 1/12/2004 as a G.M.B- site.

       c)  Landfill being managed by a M S P (Waste Group Ingwe) in compliance with speccifications from the I.W.M.P.[Integrated Waste Management  Plan]   

d) Public off loading facility each at:  Nkowankowa, Lenyenye, Letsitele,and Haenertsburg. [Only for OFF- LOADING by the Public: NOT A TRANSFERSTATION ] 

e) 6m³ skips utilized for this purpose and are cleaned on a daily basis at the Tzaneen Regional Landfill.

 f) All P.O.F.`s (public offloading facilities) are managed by a MSP (Waste Group Ingwe )                                                                                                                            g) No municipal employee utilized at these facilities

4. PUBLIC TOILETS

a)   8x public toilet blocks managed by Tzaneen Solid Waste

*4x block at Tzaneen 

*1x block at Nkowankowa

*1x block at Letsitele

*1x block at Haenertsburg

*1x block at Lenyenye

               b)Blocks open for 12 hours daily

               c)Cleaning and disinfecting of blocks every 5 hours

               d)Provision of toilet paper

 

 

 

 

 

3. Strategic objectives.

1.    WASTE  MINIMIZATION

a)Recycling.

b)Composting.

c)Re-use.

d)Clean schools programme.[Rural areas]

2.   COLLECTION  AND  TRANSPORTATION.

a) Kerbside collection.

b) Recycling at resource.

       c)  Public off loading facilities.

       d)  Waste by rail.

e)  Litter picking.

f)   Hazardous waste.

3.    DISPOSAL AND TREATMENT.

a) Permitted treatment facilities.

b) Permitted disposal sites.

c) Registered transfer stations/public off-loading facilities.

4.   ORGANISATIONAL  MEASURES.

a) Key focus areas/role players.

b) MIS [Info Systems]

c) Key performance indicators.

d) Electronic capturing.

 

 

 

 

 

4. Key Focus Areas versus problems/challenges.

1.   WASTE MINIMIZATION (DESCRIPTION/PROBLEMS.

a) Formal recycling system exists.=1X project p.a.[2005 in Tzaneen ]

       b) Formal composting plant exists[adjacent to the Landfill]

        c)  No gas extraction system exists on the landfill site.

2.   WASTE COLLECTION & TRANSPORT. (DESCRIPTION/PROBLEMS)

a) OLD VEHICLES – vehicle fleet 15+ years old (no stand-by vehicles) no transportation cost study exits.

        b) RURAL & VILLAGES – no removal of bio-hazardous waste from rur

        al areas.         

        c) MAIN ROADS CLEANING – no removal of general waste from rural

        areas. 

3.   POLLUTION CONTROL. (DESCRIPTION/PROBLEMS)

 a) POLICING OF ILLEGAL DUMPING – No regular policing of illegal dumpings.

b) COURT PROCEDURES – lack of municipal court/sentences.

4.   TREATMENT &  DISPOSAL. (DESCRIPTION/PROBLEMS)

a) PERMITS – landfill permit issued [1/12/2004]

b) REGISTRATION OF TRANSFER STATIONS – application for exemptions.

c) DEVELOPMENT PLAN – scale model.

5.   ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE. (DESCRIPTION/PROBLEMS)

a) ADMIN SUPPORT.

        *No Admin-Officer.

*Electronic capturing of info.

*Budget support [ grants and funds ]

*Lack of appropriate software.

b)       MIS-No Provincial waste info system.

c)        INTEGRATED MANAGEMENT – lack of dedication from other sections in “Clean Town Committee”

 

 

 

 

 

2004/5 year

 

5.Analyses of the functions.

1.Number & cost to employer of all personnel associated with refuse removal:

®      Professional (HoS)

®      Field (Team Leader)

®      Office (Superintendents)

®      Non-professional (Labourers)

®      Temporary (Prov Employees)

®      Contract (3x contractors)

 

1

11

2

68

39

3

 

-

-

-

-

-

R5,359,873

 

2.Number of households receiving regular refuse removal services, and frequency and cost of service.

®      Removed by municipality at least once a week

®      Removed by municipality less often

®      Communal refuse dump used

®      No rubbish disposal

®      Total cost of removal and disposal.

 

9321

0

0

70713

0

 

-

-

-

-

R14,119,951

 

3.Total and projected tonnage of all refuse disposed.

®      Domestic/commercial

®      Garden

 

300 000 m³ p.a.

24 000 m³ p.a.

 

 

4.Total number, capacity and life expectancy of refuse disposal sites.

®      Domestic/commercial (x1)

®      Garden (x1)

 

1 600 000 m³

   180 000 m3

 

20 years

20 years

 

5.Anticipated expansion of refuse removal service.

®      Domestic/commercial

®      Garden

 

2560

0

 

R1,000,000

0

 

6.Free basic service provision.

®      Quantity (Number of households affected)

®      Quantum (value to each household)

 

Equitable share =

 

R5,295,072

 

7.Total operating cost of solid waste management function.

 

R20202958

 

6.Key Performance Area.

Performance during the year, performance targets against actual achieved and plans to improve performance

 

Current

 

Target

1. Waste Minimization.

a)  Recycling at landfill.

b)  Recycling at Premises.

c)  Re-use.[ Gas extraction]

d)  Compost terrain.

10%

10%

0%

100%

20%

45%

100%

100%

2. Treatment and Disposal.

a)  Permit of Landfill.

100%

100%

3. Collection &    Transportation.

a)  New, appropriate and purpose made fleet.

b)  Village collections.

0%

0%

100%

10% p.a.

4. Collection & Transportation.

a)  Removal on all generators of medical refuse

98%

100%

 

 

During construction of roads, taxi ranks and ablution facilities, local people may be appointed - thus alleviating poverty

2.5           To minimize the negative side effects which Transport may have on      environment?

2.6           The correct coding of Taxi Ranks; numbering; and clear direction signs for tourists as where to find transport to various destinations.

 

           INITIATIVES / PRIORITIES

 

1.             Construction and upgrading taxi and bus termini and ablution facilities to enhancing a healthy environment for our commuters in partnership with Provincial Department, Mopani District Municipality and other stakeholders.

 

2.             Invite all stakeholders to participate in Transport Forum where all decisions, consultations and public participation can be enhanced.  (Ward Councilors also included)

 

3.             Consult with local depots dealing with hazardous substances; the SAPS and Fire Department to initiate proposals of diverting the route of transporting such substances.

 

                Proposed routes through Tzaneen CBD

²R21 – from Greater Letaba Municipality into Ba-Phalaborwa /Gravellote Road passing outside Tzaneen Town. Entering Tzaneen CBD, turning right into Claude Wheatley into Sapekoe Drive and out on the Lydenburg road.

    Route for both directions

²Enforced local deliveries of hazardous subsistence with the necessary Delivery Notes. Municipal Traffic Department will display signs prohibiting the usage of certain roads by such transportation.

 

4.             Drafting a Transport By-Laws for implementation at all upgraded taxi ranks -

                including tariffs.

 

5.             Consultation with various stakeholders such as Department Transport and Taxi Associations towards to recapitalization process initiated by the National Department of Transport on the process of substituting mini-buses with midi-buses. Maxi Taxi licencing will also be attended to during this consultation.           

B. INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT PLAN

 

C. WATER SECTOR  PLAN

 

Recently, Mopani District Municipality has been assigned the Water Services Authority in terms of the Structures Act of 1998.

 

Mopani District Municipality has developed a Water Services Development Plan and due to the bulkiness and technicality of the document, it is not included in this plan, but is available for inspection at the Civil Engineering Department or Mopani District Municipality.

D. INTEGRATED SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK

 

1.             GENERAL BACKGROUND

 

A Spatial Development Framework is a key component to the successful compilation and implementation of an Integrated Development Plan (IDP).  The purpose of a Spatial Development Framework (SDF) is to provide guidance in respect of decision-making and action towards the establishment of integrated and habitable towns.  A secondary purpose of the SDF is to establish a strategic framework for an appropriate land use management system.

 

The formulation of the SDF gives effect to further compliance with the Municipal Systems Act, 2002, and the Municipal Performance Management Regulations.  The Land Use Bill also stipulates that each municipality shall formulate and implement a Spatial Development Framework The abbreviated framework presented below represents a very concise extract from the Greater Tzaneen Spatial Development Framework.

 

2.             THE SITUATION

 

Tzaneen Town is situated roughly in the centre of the municipal area at the convergence of major arterial routes.  Although settlement concentration is average by comparison (i.e. in terms of the total number of residential sites) the town has by far the highest concentration of business, industrial, social, financial, recreational and infrastructural facilities and services within the municipal area.  The town takes up approximately 849 ha.

 

Nkowankowa, situated some 13 km east of Tzaneen and north of the Provincial Road P 17/3 is the largest proclaimed town within the municipal area (862 ha) with the highest number of stands (5250).

 

Lenyenye situated 10 km further east of Nkowankowa on the southern side of the same arterial, extends over roughly 230 ha and has 2519 stands, which makes it the smallest of the three major proclaimed towns, but also the most compact in terms of settlement density.

 

Haenertsburg, a small proclaimed town (142 ha) is situated at the western gateway to the municipality, exhibits a very limited residential component and a low settlement density, but serves as service node with considerable tourism appeal and potential.

 

Letsitele, situated nine kilometres east of Nkowankowa and south of the P43/3, is the smallest of the proclaimed towns, extending over 102 ha with a total of 123 stands has an unusually well-developed business area, which is attributed to the fact that the town serves as retail and social service centre to a large farming community and the resident population of a number of rural villages within a 10km radius of the town.

 

By far the largest concentration of rural settlements occurs in the southern quadrant of the municipal area where 69 % of the population resides on 67 % of the residential stands.  The second concentration of rural settlements occurs in the northern quadrant of the municipal area, where 27% of the people reside on 26,5.% of residential stands. 

 

 

3.             SPATIAL PATTERNS AND TRENDS

 

3.1           RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT

 

Approximately 10, 5% of residential stands occur in the proclaimed towns, while the remaining 89, 5% of residential stands are informally demarcated sites in rural villages.  This has the implication that only 10% of households within the municipality have permanent title to their houses, and the advantages commensurate with tenure.

 

A characteristic of current residential development is that it is low density; the average density being 5 stands per ha.  This is conducive to urban sprawl as a gross rate of 2000 m² per stand relates to an average nett extent of 1 440 m² per residential stand.  With an average floor area of residential dwellings calculating to 172m², this represents a floor area ratio of 0, 12 (12% coverage).  It can therefore be deduced that residential land, which is a scarce resource, is generally being grossly underutilized, as acceptable norms dictate coverage of 50%.  Simply put, residential stands are currently too big on average, the average floor area of dwellings dictating that residential erven should expand over 350m².

 

3.2           BUSINESS AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT

 

Business and industrial development is concentrated in TZANEEN town, where there are 402 retail businesses and industries on 298 stands concentrated in the CBD and industrial areas of the town.  In addition, the town boasts a full complement of financial and banking institutions and facilities and an extended office zone.  A total of 37% of all businesses and industries within the municipality are concentrated in one town on 48, 7% of land designated for this purpose (158 ha out of a total of 324 ha).  A further characteristic of especially the business development in Tzaneen is its sophistication in relation to the rest of the municipal area (excellent variety of goods and services, variety of choice, and competition). 

 

In general, business erven in Nkowankowa and Lenyenye are under-utilized or vacant. A characteristic is further that residential sites are being developed as business premises.  Limited growth of business, in spite of the considerable population concentration within the catchment area suggests that business in Nkowankowa and Lenyenye succeeds in intercepting only a modest share of the expendable income present within the local economy.

 

A problem throughout the municipality, but especially at transportation hubs, is informal trading which is a potential traffic and pollution hazard.  Incidences of this phenomenon are prevalent at intersections of district routes and provincial routes, especially where this occurs at a village (Dan, Mohlaba Cross, Maake, Lenyenye, Rita, to name a few examples).  An exposition of extent and distribution of business and industrial development is contained in Table 1.

 

TABLE 1: INCIDENCE AND EXTENT OF BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY WITHIN GTM (2003-07-17)

Urban Concentration

No of Households

No of Businesses and Industries

No of Sites

Land Area

Proclaimed Towns

10767

563

434

281 ha

Percentage Of Total

11,47%

63%

70%

86%

Villages

83058

317

186

43 ha

Percentage Of Total

88,53%

37%

30%

14%

TOTAL

93825

880

620

324ha

Source: CBD policy Tzaneen, Nkowankowa, Lenyenye, and SDF survey, 2003

 

 

3.3           SOCIAL FACILITIES

 

By applying the norm of 1 primary school per 450 households and 1 secondary school per 1000 households, it would appear that there is a backlog of 7 primary schools and no secondary schools within proclaimed towns.  By the same token there is a backlog of 63 primary schools and 22 secondary schools in the villages.  Initial indications are that the major backlogs with regard to educational facilities occur within the village concentration around Nkowankowa and Lenyenye, and in the area around Mandlhakazi, Fofoza, Mandlhazi and Xihoko.

 

Health facilities generally appear to occur in the areas of population concentration, with proclaimed towns being much better served than the rural areas.  If the norms for the provision of health facilities is applied (especially the distance parameters), most villages are within range of health facilities.  It would appear that quality, and not so much quantity, is a backlog in respect of health facilities.

 

If the Department of Health and Welfare norm for acceptable travelling distances to hospitals, health centres and clinics is applied to the GTM circumstances, the following situation emerges:

§         77% of communities are situated within 20 km radius of a hospital;

§         50% of communities are situated within a 10 km radius of a health centre, and

§         95% of communities are situated within a 5 km radius of a clinic.

 

It could be derived that there would be negligible impact on future spatial planning by health facility needs, as the most appropriate and cost-effective way to bring health facilities to villages with less than 1 000 residents would be by way of mobile clinics.

 

Although active and passive recreation is an important and integral part of daily life, funding to develop land which has been set aside for this purpose is in short supply due to other pressing needs, such as water provision and roads maintenance.  Parks and other recreational facilities are not income-generating assets, and are therefore for the most part left undeveloped.

 

The scarcity and value of land suited for urban development has given rise to the practice of designating water courses and erosion furrows as parks in order to make up required percentages.  This land can normally not be used for recreation, defeating the purpose of the allocation.

 

Visual observation in the villages suggests that land for recreation is not in short supply, while the funding to develop the available land is lacking. Future spatial planning should focus on the incorporation of functional active and passive recreation areas and facilities within the urban context, which stands to become critical as densities increase.

 

3.4           MINING AND MINERALS

 

There is limited mining activity within the GTM area, mentioned activity being restricted to mainly quarrying and excavation of clay and sand.  There is nevertheless considerable prospecting activity within the GTM boundaries, as depicted on Map 4. 

 

3.5           AGRICULTURE

 

Large areas of the municipal area are taken up by land with high agricultural potential.  Four broad types of farming occur within the municipal area, these being:

§         timber in the south western and western parts of the municipality;

§         subtropical fruit and citrus production in the western and central parts;

§         cattle and game farming in the eastern section of the municipality, and

§         Dryland cultivation of maize on the outskirts of villages in the rural areas.

 

High potential agricultural land takes up roughly 27% of the land area of the municipality.  The incidence and location of high potential agricultural land have been depicted on Map 2.

 

3.6           CONSERVATION AREAS

 

Three significant designated conservation areas occur within the study area, these being:

 

§         a cluster of 24 farms in the western quadrant, extending from Kolbosch 961 LS in the south to Weltevreden 442 LT in the north, and including De Hoek 547 LT, and Grootbosch 444 LT;

§         a group of 4 farms situated on the southern boundary of the municipality, including Wolkberg 634 LT and Forest Reserve 8 KT, and

§         the farm Duplex 467 LT, situated 18 km east of Tzaneen, which has been listed due to the diversity of plant species.

 

The designated conservation areas are estimated to extend over roughly 5% of the land area of the municipality. 

 

An application is lodged to declare the grasslands at Haenertsburg Town as an Environmental Heritage site as a means to conserve, protect and manage the grasslands area in the Wolkberg.

 

The entire drainage system, inclusive of the six major dams, is considered to be environmentally sensitive areas largely due to the ever-present danger of damage to the eco-systems through over-exploitation and pollution.  The locality and extent of conservation areas, exemption farms and other environmentally sensitive areas are depicted on Map 2.

 

3.7           LAND OWNERSHIP AND REFORM

 

In terms of land area, roughly 38% of the 3240 sq.km is registered in ownership to the State.  This calculates to 1231 sq.km.  The remainder of the land (2009 sq.km) is in private ownership.

 

A characteristic of the Greater Tzaneen Municipality is that traditional commonage (vacant land in ownership of the local authority) does not exist.  This has the implication that all land for development purposes must either be released by a State Department, traditional authority, or purchased from private landowners.

 

4.             SPATIAL OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIES

 

4.1           OBJECTIVES

 

The Greater Tzaneen Municipality will pursue the following objectives to achieve the desired spatial form of the municipality.

Objective 1:                   The sustainable utilization of all land within the municipal area to its fullest potential and benefit.

Objective 2:                   The restriction of wastage of land through urban sprawl, degradation of the natural environment and/or sterilization of resources.

Objective 3:                   The concentration of development to derive social and economic benefits for the community.

Objective 4:                   The utilization of existing development and infrastructure capacity.

Objective 5:                   The promotion of good internal and external accessibility through the optimal use of existing roads network.

Objective 6:                   The support of economic growth through the judicious exploitation of natural and artificial resources.

Objective 7:                   The promotion of orderly development through timeous preparation and planning.

Objective 8:                   The manipulation of development to achieve a hierarchal settlement development pattern.

Objective 9:                   The promotion of land restitution and reform to achieve equitable access to land and security of tenure.

4.2           STRATEGIES

 

The achievement of the Spatial Objectives of the GTM revolves around:

 

§         support of natural/inherent potential;

§         anticipation of growth and timeous action, and

§         Manipulation and intervention.

 

The strategies to achieve the listed objectives are presented below:

 

Strategy A:                    Determine utilization potential of all land and limit development to best usage through policy and/or statutory plan.

Strategy B:                    Adopt applicable minimum standards as policy.

Strategy C:                   Enforce and/or support enforcement of legislation regulating environmental and resource conservation.

Strategy D:                   Manipulate placement of social and economic facilities and opportunities both directly and undirectly at places with inherent development potential.

Strategy E:                    Determine surplus infrastructural capacity areas and plan to optimise utilization.

Strategy F:                    Place development at, and in proximity to, existing arterial routes.

Strategy G:                   Support economic growth opportunities by creating the spatial and infrastructural framework for economic and commercial opportunities.

Strategy H:                   Anticipate growth and plan ahead, both spatially and physically.

Strategy I:                     Concentrate municipal development in the identified development potential areas.

Strategy J:                    Institute a formalization program to systematically formalize settlements to effect tenure.

Strategy K:                    Support judicious land reform initiatives.

 

5.             IDENTIFICATION OF BENEFICIAL SPATIAL PATTERN

 

5.1           GENERAL PRINCIPLES

 

The desired spatial form of the municipality is dependent on the meticulous application of the following principles:

 

§         Sustainable use of land to fullest potential and benefit;

§         Minimal wastage of land through sprawl, degradation, sterilization;

§         Concentration of development to the social and economic benefit of the community;

§         Utilization of existing development and infrastructure capacity;

§         Good accessibility through well-developed roads network and optimal use of existing roads;

§         Vibrant economy and economic growth through spontaneous growth of economic sector;

§         Orderly development;

§         Concentrated urban core, intermediate levels of development and hinterland (hierarchy of towns and settlements), and

§         Tenure/land reform.

 

 

5.2           DEVELOPMENT HIERARCHY AND SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT NODES

 

The application of the criteria has resulted in the emergence of a hierarchal order of four distinct levels of development, which are presented in Table 2 below and are in line with the Provincial Spatial Rationale.  The last column summarizes the focus of development in the node, which should guide IDP project planning and budgeting. 

 

The nodes/clusters have been listed together and in descending order.


TABLE 2: SETTLEMENT HIERARCHY GREATER TZANEEN MUNICIPALITY

 

DEVELOPMENT AREA

 

DESIGNATION

AFFECTED TOWNS & VILLAGES

FUNCTION

DEVELOPMENT FOCUS

1st ORDER : PRIMARY

NODES

High Potential for development.  Have sizable economic sector providing jobs.  Have regional function and large number of social and institutional facilities.  High population.

1

NKOWANKOWA/

LETSITELE VILLAGES

Nkowankowa, Letsitele, Dan, Lusaka, Mbambamencisi

Khujwana, Mariveni, Petanenge, Mokgolobotho

Residential, business, industries, institutional

To become the primary development area which attracts people from the region or beyond, through the creation of a conducive environment for business, industrial and institutional development. 

Acquisition of land and township establishment to timeously provide serviced sites. Prevention of indiscriminate settlement.

First priority to provide and encourage residential, formal business, industrial, infrastructural, social and economic development.

Urban Renewal : Revival of Bindzulani centre and industrial development.

Formalisation of informal settlements.

Community and village tourism development.

2

TZANEEN

Tzaneen

Residential, business, industries, institutional, tourism

To sustain the area as a primary development area through receiving first priority for provision and encouragement of residential, formal business, industrial, infrastructural, social and economic development.

Acquisition of land and township establishment to timeously provide for serviced sites.

First priority for Tourism Development (Tzaneen Dam, Tourist Information centre)

1st ORDER : SECONDARY

NODES

High Potential for development.  Have sizable economic sector providing jobs.  Have regional function and large number of social and institutional facilities.  High population.

 

LENYENYE

Lenyenye, Mohlaba Cross, Moime, Rita, Khopo, Marumafase, Maake, Pulaneng

Residential, business, institutional

Second priority for residential, infrastructural, social and economic development.

1st Priority for development of Filling station with Taxi Rank and Hawker Esplanades.

First Priority for development of Maake Shopping Centre

First priority for provision of a cemetery and community hall.

Prevention of indiscriminate settlement

Community and village tourism development.

Acquisition of land for township extensions

1st ORDER : TERTIARY

NODES

Smaller economic sector, few local businesses. Few higher order social and institutional activities.  Have reasonable number of people.  Exhibit natural growth potential if positively stimulated.

1

MAMITWA

Nwamitwa, Mandlhakazi, Nwajaheni, Fofoza, Mandlhazi, Lwandlamuni

Residential, business

Third priority for residential, infrastructural, social and local economic development.

3rd Priority for development of a formal business, bus/taxi terminal and hawkers esplanades.

Development of a multi-purpose service centre.

2

HAENERTSBURG

Haenertsburg

Business, tourism

Third priority for residential, infrastructural, social and local economic development.

First priority for Conservation and Tourism Development. 

Acquisition of land for creation of sites(Haenertsburg Town and Townlands).  Provision for service industrial sites. 

First priority for declaring grasslands as Environmental Heritage Site.

3

BURGERSDORP

Burgersdorp, Gabaza, Myakayaka, Shiromong, Sunnyside, Shiluvane.

Residential

Third priority for residential, infrastructural, social and local economic development.

Development of a multi-purpose service centre.

2nd ORDER : POPULATION CONCENTRATION POINTS

(As defined in Spatial Rationale) Villages with small or virtually no economic base, meaningful social and often institutional activities.  Located adjacent to main roads or intersections.

1

THAPANE

Mopye, Motupa, Marirone, Thapane, Mapitlula, Fobeni, Lerejeni, Leokwe, Motlakong, Morutji, Bokhuata, Relela, Sethome, Botludi, Mothomeng, Semarela, Khethneeng, Ramphelo, Phadasediba, Kubjane

Rural residential

Fourth priority for residential, infrastructural, social and local economic development.

To attract people from smaller villages in the area with a lower level or no service infrastructure.

 

2

 

Parare, Mogapeni

 

Fourth priority for residential, infrastructural, social and local economic development. To attract people from smaller villages in the area with a lower level or no service infrastructure.

 

 

3

MOGOBOYA

Mogoboya, Khopo, Segabeni

 

Fourth priority for residential, infrastructural, social and local economic development. To attract people from smaller villages in the area with a lower level or no service infrastructure.

Development of a multi-purpose service centre.

3rd  ORDER : LOCAL SERVICE POINTS

Exhibit some development potential based on population growth and/or service function potential.  Very limited or no economic base. Most have 5000+ people.  Isolated settlements.  Potential for self-sustained development growth is limited by lack of development opportunities.  Some have government and/or social services.

1

 

Runnymede, Xihoko, Nwamugololo,

 

Fifth priority for residential, infrastructural, social and local economic development.

Development of a multi-purpose service centre.

Establish a skills development centre.

2

 

Senagwe, Senopelwa

 

Fifth priority for residential, infrastructural, social and local economic development.

 

3

 

Mokgwathi Block 10 and 11

 

Fifth priority for residential, infrastructural, social and local economic development.

 

4

 

Maweni

 

Fifth priority for residential, infrastructural, social and local economic development.

 

5

 

Miragoma, Malubana

 

Fifth priority for residential, infrastructural, social and local economic development.

 

4th & 5th ORDER : VILLAGES

Small settlements with less than 5000 people, usually less than 1000 people.  Group of settlements are usually mutually dependent on social infrastructure.

 

All remaining villages

 

 

Sixth priority(long term) for residential, infrastructural(RDP standard), social and local economic development.   Larger villages to receive first preference in this category

 

 

 

5.3.          DIRECTION AND EXTENT OF DEVELOPMENT

 

5.3.1        DETERMINATION OF GROWTH

 

In order to predict extent and direction of growth, it is necessary to anticipate the rate of growth in population at each nodal point and then to translate this growth into a land requirement.

 

5.3.2        DIRECTION OF DEVELOPMENT IN PERSPECTIVE

 

From the analysis of spatial patterns and trends and the calculation of anticipated scale of development within the planning period, the following observations can be drawn:

 

§         the scale of anticipated development is not sufficient to completely correct the spatial pattern in the coming 10 years, and

§         the incidence of competing land uses (agriculture, mining, tourism) will impact on the placement of future urban development.

 

TABLE 3 : DIRECTIONS OF DEVELOPMENT

NODAL POINT

AREA

DIRECTION

LAND DESCRIPTION

EXTENT

PRIMARY
NODES

Nkowankowa, Letsitele and

North-west

Part of Mohlaba Location 567 LT

202 ha

villages

North-west

Part Ledzee 559 LT

398 ha

 

East/South east

Part Mohlaba's Location 567 LT

443 ha

Tzaneen

Central

Pusela 555 LT Ptn 183, 184, 186, 241, 266, 391, 48, 51, 57, 58, 59, 75

46 ha

 

West

Ptn 4 Pusela 555 LT

193 ha

 

South

Part Extension 40

100 ha

 

South-West

Part Extension 18

30 ha

SECONDARY
NODES

Lenyenye and villages

North

Mohalaba's Location 567 LT

515 ha

TERTIARY
NODES

Nkambako/Mamitwa and villages

Convergent

 

160 ha

Burgersdorp/Gabaza

South east

 

140 ha

 

5.3.3           MAJOR TRANSPORT & MOVEMENT CORRIDORS

 

5.3.3.1        EXTERNAL MOVEMENT CORRIDORS

 

The Greater Tzaneen Municipal area is transversed by a national road which intersects the N1 approximately 30 km south of Makhado and joins the N4 at Nelspruit, the latter-mentioned route being the Maputo Corridor, and the N1 being the major route to Zimbabwe and other Southern African states.  The route through Tzaneen has been designated as a Maputo sub-corridor.  See Map 6.

 

The most direct route linking Tzaneen to Gauteng is the Provincial Route P17-2 over Polokwane, where it joins the N1.  This route bears the highest volume of commercial and passenger traffic, which is largely due to:

 

§         The economic activity in the north-eastern Lowveld (sub-tropical and citrus fruit for export, mining activity at Gravelotte and Phalaborwa);

§         The high concentration of people in the area, and their employment links with Gauteng;

§         The popularity of the Ba-Phalaborwa Gate of the Kruger National Park, and

§         The link that Tzaneen has with Polokwane, which is the capital of the Limpopo Province.

 

5.3.3.2        INTERNAL MOVEMENT CORRIDORS

 

The following significant internal movement corridors within the municipality have been identified and are listed in perceived descending order of utilization:

 

§         P17/3 between Tzaneen and Burgersdorp/Gabaza;

§         P43/3 and D978 linking Tzaneen to the western part of the rural north villages;

§         P43/3 and D1292 linking Tzaneen to the eastern part of the rural north villages;

§         P43/3 between Tzaneen and Letsitele, and

§         D5011 and D8 between Nkowankowa and Letsitele.

 

The most travelled major arterial within the Greater Tzaneen area is the section of the P17/3 between Nkowankowa and Rita.  The movement between Tzaneen and Nkowankowa, Lenyenye and rural south villages comprises public and private passenger transport mainly in the form of passenger buses and minibus taxis.  The traffic is generated due to employment opportunities in Tzaneen and the retail function of the Tzaneen CBD.  Transportation of agricultural produce and manufactured goods also contributes to traffic generation along this route.  It is estimated that roughly 74% of people employed in Tzaneen, who reside outside the town, make use of this transportation corridor (Housing Project Survey, 1999), therefore emphasizing the necessity to upgrade the road.

 

The vehicular traffic between Tzaneen and the rural north villages is almost exclusively public passenger transportation.  Movement between Letsitele and Tzaneen is thought to be more commercial than passenger, while the causes for movement between Nkowankowa and Letsitele are employment and retail.

 

The movement along the significant arterials has been schematically depicted on Map 6.

 

 

6.                GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR LAND USE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

 

A future land use management system(lums) for Greater Tzaneen Municipality should consider the following general guidelines:

 

§          the lums should be consistent with, and support the objectives of, the local SDF, the local IDP, the provincial SDF, provincial and national environmental and planning legislation and plans;

§          the lums should ideally determine land uses and conditions for every piece of land within the municipal area;

§          the conditions should be rigid enough to effectively control and manage land use and development but flexible enough to accommodate various levels of development with varying impact on the land use pattern of the municipality, and

§          the lums should incorporate municipal policies in respect of land use, development zones, areas designated for specific types and intensities of development.

 

7.                CAPITAL INVESTMENT FRAMEWORK

 

The compilation of a capital investment framework for the implementation of the Spatial Development Framework before the finalization of the Plan is, at best, a theoretical exercise.

 

The main cost components for the spatial implementation of the Plan are:

§    purchase of land, and

§    Statutory preparation of land, inclusive of geotechnical and environmental investigations, town planning, survey, legal fees, etc.

 

The capital investment framework could be extended to include the provision of infrastructural services.  The costs to this component are extremely variable as proximity and capacity of bulk services and the level of services impact on the end cost per unit.  By the same token statutory preparation costs are quite stable and therefore predictable, while land cost could vary from zero to R150 000/ha.  The programming for implementation also impacts on the end cost.  A capital investment framework is presented in Table 4.

 

TABLE 4 : CAPITAL INVESTMENT FRAMEWORK 2003 - 2013

 

FINANCIAL

CYCLE

 

COST

COMPONENT

BACKLOG

2003/2004

2004/2005

2005/2006

2006/2007

2007/2008

2008/2013

TOTAL

LAND ACQUISITION

R 14.4M

R 4.15M

R 4.15M

R 4.15M

R 4.15M

R 4.15M

R 24.90M

R 60.05M

GEOTECHNICAL SURVEY

R 0.23M

R 0.12M

R 0.12M

R 0.12M

R 0.12M

R 0.12M

R 0.72M

R 1.55M

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT

R 0.45M

R 0.28M

R 0.28M

R 0.28M

R 0.28M

R 0.28M

R 1.35M

R 3.2M

TOWN PLANNING

R 1.85M

R 0.45M

R 0.45M

R 0.45M

R 0.45M

R 0.45M

R 5.20M

R 9.3M

SURVEY

R 3.8M

R 0.8M

R 0.8M

R 0.8M

R 0.8M

R 0.8M

R 11.49M

R 19.29M

LEGAL WORK

R 0.2M

R 0.05M

R 0.05M

R 0.05M

R 0.05M

R 0.05M

R 0.7M

R 1.15M

INFRASTRUCTURAL RETICULATION (NO BULK)

R 74.5M

R 14.9M

R 14.9M

R 14.9M

R 14.9M

R 14.9M

R 205.8M

R 354.8M

TOTAL

R 95.43M

R 20.75 M

R 20.75 M

R 20.75 M

R 20.75 M

R 20.75 M

R 250.16 M

R 449.34 M

 

 

 

8.             LAND USE POLICY AND DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES

 

The following represent a summary of land use policies and land development principles, according to which decisions will be made by Council regarding future use and development of land within the municipal area.   Land use development policies will be updated on yearly basis through the IDP and SDF to conform to dynamic trends and community needs. The following should be applied and read together with existing legislation and policy documents related to land management and development.

 

8.1     General Land Development Policy Principles

 

a)       Nodal areas are urban areas with highest potential for development according to spatial nodal hierarchy.

b)      Priority areas for development, provision of physical infrastructure, and provision of social and economic facilities are as follows in descending order:

i)         Primary Node - Nkowankowa, Dan, Khujwana, Mariveni, Petanenge, Mokgolobotho, Letsitele, Tzaneen.

ii)        Secondary Node - Lenyenye, Mohlaba Cross, Moime, Marumafase, Maake.

iii)       Tertiary Node - Burgersdorp, Nkambako, Mamitwa, Mandlakazi, Gabaza, Haenertsburg.

iv)       Residential Village - Majority of village has stands with an extent up to and including 1 500m².  Primary use is residential.  Some demarcated with general plan, majority demarcated by former Department of Agriculture.

v)        Agricultural Village - Majority of village has stands with an extent in excess of 1 500m².

vi)       Agricultural Holding - As defined in terms of the Agricultural Holdings Registration Act, 1919.

vii)      Agricultural Land

c)       Land development to prevent low density urban sprawl.

d)      Land development to support fill-in development and development of compact urban areas.

e)       Land development and land use to support and ensure village areas become economically sustainable.

f)        All development to be environmentally sound.

g)      All development to make optimum use of available resources.

h)       Timeously and pro-actively identify, acquire and develop land for settlement purposes to counteract illegal occupation of land.

i)         Prevention of development of scattered business on agricultural land.

j)         Encouragement and active marketing of industrial development according to hierarchy.

k)       All land use development and management to conform to Map 6: Spatial Development Framework and the individual nodal plans.

l)         All developments, including demarcations of rural residential sites, undertaken by parastatal government departments, must be planned and executed in consultation with GTM.

m)     All land development and usages to conform to related legislation, such as  Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations, Development Facilitation Act, 1995(DFA), etc. and requirements from government departments.

n)       All land development and usages to conform to IDP integrated plans and sector plans.

 

8.2           Residential Development

 

a)       Primary, secondary and tertiary nodes:

i)         Priority be given to residential development within these nodal hierarchies by means of :

§         acquisition of land,

§         creation of affordable erven,

§         provision of RDP housing,

§         servicing of existing demarcated erven as a means to provide in the extreme need for erven,

§         encouragement of private sector to invest in residential development and to service and/or develop available erven, and

§         Formalization and servicing of informal settlements.

 

b)      Residential Villages :

(Majority of village has stands with extent up to and including 1500m² (general norm for residential stands on communal land is 20m x 40m = 800m²)

i)         Residential extensions to these villages should be limited.  Extension should equal need created by natural population growth rate.

ii)        Encouragement of densification of stands and prevention of wastage of land.

iii)       Villages to receive basic services.  Priority be given to areas with greatest need, closest to urban areas, and where most people will benefit, as determined in sector plans.

 

c)       Agricultural Villages:

(Majority of village has stands with extent more than 1500m², used for residential and agricultural purposes)

i)         Residential extensions to these agricultural villages will be discouraged. 

ii)        Densification of stands will be discouraged because it will create unsustainable living units. 

iii)       Application for densification and creation of agricultural stands, will be considered on individual basis and according to need, desirability and after consideration of environmental impact.

iv)       Agricultural villages to receive basic services.  Priority be given to areas with greatest need, closest to urban areas, as determined in sector plans.

 

d)      Formalisation:

i)         Formalisation of informal settlements will be directed towards, and priority be given to areas situated directly adjacent to proclaimed towns and within primary nodal areas.

ii)        Implementation of valuations and assessment rates to support formalisation.

 

e)       Private residential development:

i)         Will be encouraged and considered on an individual basis according to compliance to the SDF, Nodal plans, DFA land development principles, need, desirability and after consideration of environmental impact.

 

f)        RDP housing:

i)         Priority allocation to be made where greatest need exists in nodal areas.

ii)        Individual allocation to be scattered within settlements.

 

g)      Densification:

i)         Promotion of densification of residential areas that would not negatively impact on valuation of land, service infrastructure and residential character.  Form and size of subdivisional portions should fit in with configuration of sites in surrounding area.   Existing policy regarding minimum extent of Single Residential erven is confirmed:

§         Tzaneen Town, except Tzaneen Extension 13: 500m², panhandle or right of way servitude excluded.

§         Tzaneen Extension 13, extensions thereto and all suburbs: 250m², panhandle or right of way servitude excluded.

ii)        Maximum size of future single residential erven in villages to be 1000m² which provides for adequate space for self-sustainable gardening, ensures viable service provision and prevention of wastage of residential and agricultural land.

iii)       Residential 3 and Residential 4 zonings will only be allowed within urban transitional zones and in areas as depicted and or specified in terms of accepted guideline policy documentation to be adopted by Council in terms of the Nodal Development Policy and Plan.

 

h)      Size of dwelling:

i)         Existing policy regarding minimum extent of a dwelling together with outbuildings to be erected on single residential erven, is confirmed:

§         Tzaneen Town, except Tzaneen Extension 13: 60m²

§         Tzaneen Extension 13 and extensions thereto : 40m²,

§         Suburbs of Tzaneen : 25m²

 

i)        Disposal of Municipal land:

i)         Allocation of newly demarcated and serviced stands and alienation of stands will be according to the Policy on Alienation and Disposal of Municipal Land.

 

8.3     Business development

 

Tzaneen, Nkowankowa, Letsitele, Lenyenye and Haenertsburg are regarded as the formal business nodes within GTM.  The remaining business development occurs mainly scattered along arterial routes or within settlement areas.

 

a)       Business development, especially in villages to move towards creation of central business areas at central accessible localities to ensure viable local service points that provide a wider variety of commodities and services to surrounding community.  Scattered business development will be prohibited.

b)      Corner shops/spaza’s within residential areas that provide basic commodities to surrounding residents, will only be allowed within 200m of each other.

c)       Telecommunication containers within residential areas will only be allowed within 500m of each other.

d)      LED strategy  and Incentive policy to encourage the development of vacant business erven, especially in Nkowankowa and Lenyenye.

e)       To plan and facilitate the development of a bus/taxi rank with hawker facilities in Lenyenye on Erven 2160 and 2161.

f)        Need for Tzaneen CBD to expand should be made viable through budgeting for building of bridge to provide access to land opposite the Letaba River.

g)      Business development adjacent to provincial roads to comply to building lines and development requirements.

h)       CBD DEVELOPMENT PLANS:

Office and Business development and extensions within proclaimed townships will be only  allowed if it is in line with the zones contained in the CBD Policy Plans for Tzaneen, Nkowankowa and Lenyenye, which policy plan and zones are approved as part of the SDF Nodal Development Plans (Map 6, 6-1,6-2).

 

Tzaneen CBD Policy Plan, dated May 2005:

To counter the negative effect that overprovision of land could have on Tzaneen CBD momentum, Council adopts a policy that the state of development of Phase 1 future  business and/or office zone, should be 75% developed before permission will be allowed for extension of offices or business in Phase 2 (arrows on SDF Map 6-1). 

Suburban business centres will be allowed on merit on an individual basis, according to the Nodal Development Plan.

 

Nkowankowa CBD Policy Plan, dated May 2005

The CBD should be centrally located in the catchment area with a high degree of internal and external accessibility, and should serve as the main shopping centre. The CBD should ideally comprise the largest concentration of business activities, administration, government functions and high density development.  A hierarchy of business centre should be developed in such a fashion that these centres do not complete with, but rather complement the CBD.

Criteria to be implemented:

§         The business area in Unit A be the designated CBD for Nkowankowa, and that support be given to the spatial, infrastructural and economic development of this area;

§         Bindzulani area be designated a suburban shopping centre, to serve Dan and extensions, and to act as interceptor for trade which would otherwise be lost to Nkowankowa;

§         The status quo for business land in Unit B and C be limited to existing business-zoned land and to allow market forces to determine ultimate utilization (i.e. change of land use to residential usages for example);

§         New spaza’s will be allowed on condition that there is no spaza or business site within 200 metres of the development site.

§          Telecommunication containers be allowed in the event of there being no other container within a radius of 500 metres.

Lenyenye CBD Policy Plan, dated May 2005:

Suburban node: Market forces are responsible for the spontaneous development of business at the entrance to Lenyenye.  This development coincides with a public transportation break point, where commuters to rural areas disembark. It is the intersection in Lenyenye which carries the largest volume of traffic.  This intersection will be the only designated suburban business node in Lenyenye.

Corner shops and spaza’s: In terms of the norms, there should be eight corner shops in Lenyenye.  The spaza’a has largely taken over the role of corner shops.  Corner shop development will be evaluated on an ad hoc basis according to merit.  New spaza’s will be allowed on condition that there is no spaza or business site within 200 metres of the development site.  Telecommunication containers be allowed in the event of there being no other container within a radius of 500 metres.

i)         Business and commercial development on agricultural land will be judged on an individual basis after thorough analysis of:

§         proof of need for development;

§         proof of desirability of development;

§         motivation for decentralization;

§         should be a single development;

§         environmental impact assessment;

§         consideration of alternative sites;

§         compliance to SDF Nodal Plan; and

§         compliance to DFA principles

 

j)         Rural Community Centres:

i)         Community centres (for purposes of business, taxi/bus ranks, recreation, education, tourism etc.) should be planned, marketed for development and/or upgraded through strategic partnerships at:

§         Bindzulani Centre

§         Maake Plaza

§         Mamitwa Centre

ii)        Private initiative should be supported for sustaining development of Tarentaalrand Crossing and The Junction, Letsitele as centres for tourism, recreation and educational purposes.

iii)       Rural community centres should not replace, duplicate or negatively affect central business areas in towns, therefore expansion will be limited.

 

8.4     Industrial and Mining development

 

Nkowankowa is regarded as the primary industrial node and Tzaneen as the secondary industrial node.

 

a)                   Industrial development and attracting investors should be marketed through LED Strategy and in conjunction with Limdev and other stakeholders.  LED Strategy to include the provision of incentives (tax holidays, low/free land cost, residential erven etc.) to attract investors.

b)                   Industrial area of Nkowankowa should be made accessible and attractive to industrialists through attending to:

§         creation of option for private land ownership;

§         upgrading of security at stands;

§         subdivision of industrial erven to be made possible for smaller service and light industries; and

§         Provision of incentives.

c)                    Industrial development on agricultural land will be prohibited.  Industrial development that will be allowed on agricultural land should at least conform to the following:

§         resource-orientated;

§         packaging and/or processing and/or assembling of agricultural products produced on own farm(s); and

§         Environmental impact assessment mitigation measures.

d)                   Other industrial developments such as power plants will be judged on merit after thorough analysis of environmental impact and consideration of alternative sites.

e)                   Community LED projects which are mostly service or light industrial activities such as brick-making, sewing, carpentry, etc., should also conform to the Spatial Development Policy requirements.  In the case of communal land, it should preferably be located adjacent to central business areas to strengthen the business centre as local service points, to be near their market for their products, and in close proximity to major link roads. 

 

8.5     Tourism  and Recreation

 

The implementation of the Tourism Framework and LED Strategy would market the development of the identified tourism projects. The priority tourism projects that might have a significant influence on the current economic situation are:

a)                   Development of De Marrilac and Avondhoek Peninsulae as the Tzaneen Dam Provincial Flagship Project.

b)                   Development of Portion 2 of Erf 872 and Extension 54 as complementary to the opposite Dam development with focus on serving the local and regional community, and more specifically entertainment and educational facilities for the children and youth.

c)                    Marketing and conserving Haenertsburg town and commonage (Haenertsburg Town and Townlands) as a tourism village and facilitating the development of land adjacent to the provincial road for tourism purposes through a strategic partnership.

d)                   Marketing and development of the Thabina Dam Nature Reserve and Noko Cultural village as tourism destinations.

e)                   The support of village tourism.

 

8.6     Conservation areas and Public Open Spaces

 

a)                   All land development and usages, should conform to the Environment Conservation Act, 1989 and its Regulations and the Environmental Management Plan and National Environmental Management Act, 1998.

b)                   Environmental sensitive areas, nature reserves, parks and related environments should be conserved.

c)                    Parks should constitute not less than 10% of the total area of a township extension, excluding flood areas.

d)                   Development and alienation of environmental sensitive areas, nature reserves and public open spaces should be judged after thorough analysis of the type of development, its environmental impact and how the development contributes towards conserving the natural environment.

e)                   Communities should become involved in the development and maintenance of parks within neighbourhoods.

 

8.7     Agricultural Land

 

a)       Agricultural land as a scare natural resource should ultimately be conserved and development thereon limited.

b)       Applications for land use change to develop on agricultural land, will be judged on an individual basis after thorough analysis of:

§               proof of need for development;

§               proof of desirability of development;

§               motivation for decentralization;

§               should be a single development;

§               environmental impact assessment;

§               alternative sites;

§               compliance to DFA principles;

§               availability of services; and

§               Agricultural potential of land(consent from National Department of Agriculture required, where applicable).

c)        Subdivision of high potential agricultural land will be discouraged.  Applications for subdivision will only be recommended in the following instances and according to the approved Policy on Subdivision of Agricultural Land:

§               Subdivision needed as result of a physical boundary, example a railway line, river or national road.  A pre-requisite might be the consolidation with adjacent property to ensure a viable economic agricultural unit;

§               Subdivision of existing or proposed non-agricultural land uses, example business;

§               In cases where subdivision would precede consolidation into more functional agricultural units;

§               For purposes of township establishment or creation of land development areas (DFA); and

§               Availability of adequate quality and quantity of water.

 

8.8     Municipal Offices

 

a)       The Municipal Civic Centre is the main office for municipal administration purposes and supported by offices in Nkowankowa, Lenyenye, Letsitele and Haenertsburg (library).

b)       Planning and Implementation for community service centres should receive priority to bring municipal and government parastatal services closer to the people.  The following clusters have been identified:

§         Cluster 1          Motupa Constituency Office (Ward 23, 24, 25, 26 and 33)

Tzaneen Office (Ward 1, 2, and 19)

§         Cluster2           Lesedi Centre (Ward 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13)

§         Cluster3           Nkowankowa Office (Ward 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 and 20)

§         Cluster4           Runnymede Training Centre (Ward 21; 22; 27; 28; 29; 30; 31; 32 and 33)

 

c)              Potential usages for Erf 88 and 89, Tzaneen should be investigated.  Previous indications referred to extension of Civic Centre to these properties.  Erf 89 is still in process of transfer from Department of Public Works to GTM.

 

8.9     Cemeteries

 

Adequate provision is made for cemeteries for Tzaneen Town.  The same does not apply to the rest of the municipal area.  Currently individual graves occur on existing residential and agricultural stands on especially communal land due to lack of central cemeteries.  Various private graveyards are established on agricultural land.

a)       Priority be given to establishment of cemeteries at Lenyenye, Mavela and Maunatlala to prevent ad hoc burials.

b)       Establishment of cemeteries to comply to Environmental Impact Assessment, Geo-technical Assessment and requirements of Department of Water Affairs.

 

8.10    Link Roads and Public Transport

 

a)       Priority be given to upgrading of main road between Tzaneen, Nkowankowa, Lenyenye to Proposed Maake Shopping Complex as it is the road carrying the highest vehicle traffic, and because it is a main public transport route.

b)       Priority should be given to construction, upgrading and rehabilitation of link roads between central business areas, community centres, municipal service centres, schools and hospitals, tourism areas, and streets according to assessment and priority in Sector Plan.

c)        Priority link roads to be constructed or upgraded or rehabilitated are:

§         Construction of a tar link road between Mamitwa nodal cluster and the Giyani road to receive priority.

§         Road D978 – Modjadji Road

§         Road D1292 - Tarantaalrand to Mamitwa

§         Road D350 – Tarentaalrand - Modjadji

§         Road D5011 and D8 between Nkowankowa and Letsitele

§         Road D1267 - Eiland / Giyani road

§         Thabina Dam - Maake road construction

d)       Priority be given to public transport routes as contained in Public Transport Plan.

e)       Public Transport Plan to investigate rail passenger transport between Nkowankowa and Tzaneen.

 

8.11    Physical Infrastructural Service Provision

   (Water, sewer, electricity, roads and stormwater, refuse removal, maintenance)

 

a)       RDP principles and minimum levels of services should be applicable to each individual internal service.

b)       Higher levels of service provision should be applicable and possible for higher order settlements(1st and 2nd order nodes as per Table 14) as categorized in the Spatial Settlement Hierarchy.

c)        Decision with regard to especially bulk service provision should primarily be based on cost effectivity (to provide a service to as many people as possible within budget limitations).

d)       Source development and bulk supply networks should focus on priority development areas(1st and 2nd order nodes), allowing for the option of higher levels of services to these higher order settlements, and minimum RDP levels of service provision to lower order nodes, which are located in the supply networks.

e)       Focus and priority should also be on service provision to 1st and 2nd order nodes with simultaneous (if possible) provision to lower order settlements which do not comply with minimum RDP standards.

f)         Services provision should only be considered for new development if it is situated in the spatial primary, secondary and tertiary nodal areas(1st order), as well as the population concentration points(2nd order).

g)       Service provision for new development to local service points(3rd order) must be considered on merit, and with good motivation.

h)       Service provision for new development in 4th and last order settlements, thus for the remaining villages, should as a rule not be considered.  This principle for the 3rd and 4th order villages however does not exclude to upgrade the service level to minimum RDP standard.

 

8.12     Social Facility Development

 

a)       Higher order social facilities(hospital, health centre, police station, secondary school, training centre etc.) must be located in higher order nodes (1st and 2nd order nodes)

b)       Lower order and/or support or even temporary services should be provided to lower order nodes, such as satellite police station, mobile clinic.

 

 

E. FIVE YEAR FINANCIAL PLAN (2005/2006 TO 2009/2010)

 

2.              Introduction

 

Over the past few years Greater Tzaneen Municipality has committed itself to a thorough and comprehensive endeavor to structure itself to meet the Developmental needs for our communities.   This resulted in us being recognized as one of the leading Municipalities in the Country.

 

Communities have however high expectations about Local Government service delivery and that Greater Tzaneen Municipality will significantly improve their living conditions, their quality of live and they will insist on being involved in decision making processes.

 

The 5 year financial plan therefore focuses on the improvement of service delivery and the addressing of the daunting physical infrastructure backlog facing the Greater Tzaneen Municipality.   The new organogramme, which has been developed to realign and improve the administration of Greater Tzaneen Municipality will also contribute to Greater Tzaneen Municipality being the fasts growing economy in the Limpopo, which will ensure access to basic services to every household.

 

3.              Legal Imperatives

 

The Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, Act 108 of 1996 determines that a Municipality must conduct its business in such a manner that services are rendered sustainable.

 

A Municipality must further manage its affairs, budgeting, administration and planning processes to give priority to the basic needs of the community, and to promote social and economic development in the community.

 

To achieve this it is important that the necessary planning be conducted to achieve the vision and objectives of the Greater Tzaneen Municipality.

 

 

The MEC for Local Government in the Limpopo Province determined that the following powers and functions with regard to service delivery be vested with the following organizations:

 

Mopani District Municipality:                     - Water Services

                                                        - Sewer Services

                                                        - Environmental Health Service

 

Limpopo Province:                                   - Community Health Service

 

Although these services have been transferred to Mopani District Municipality and Limpopo Province respectively Greater Tzaneen Municipality has been appointed service provider for the water ad sewer services.

 

Provision has also been made on the operational budget for Environmental Health and Community Health services but to date no transfer agreement has been signed for these services.

 

 

4.                    Analysts

 

Greater Tzaneen has the capacity to generate income, which will be utilized to accommodate the operational cost to improve and extend services to the communities.

 

The budgeted revenue for Greater Tzaneen Municipality which includes water, sewer, environmental health and community health services are as follows:

 

Item

Budget 2007/2008

001PROPERTY RATES

25,886,731

003PENALTIES IMPOSED AND COLLECTION CHARGES ON RATES

6,185,433

005SERVICE CHARGES

159,291,262

009RENT OF FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT

375,543

011INTEREST EARNED - EXTERNAL INVESTMENTS

1,357,160

012INTEREST EARNED - OUTSTANDING DEBTORS

2,099,290

016FINES

1,749,250

018LICENSES & PERMITS

237,533

020INCOME FROM AGENCY SERVICES

18,664,880

022OPERATING GRANTS & SUBSIDIES

68,223,782

024OTHER REVENUE

6,810,296

026GAIN ON DISPOSAL OF PROPERTY PLANT & EQUIPMENT

1,048,000

031INCOME FOREGONE

3,129,871

041INTEREST EARNED - INTERNAL LOANS

0

 

288,799,264

 

Services are rendered across Greater Tzaneen Municipality’s area of jurisdiction but service charges are only levied in the formal proclaimed urban areas:   (Tzaneen, Nkowankowa, Lenyenye, Haenertsburg and Letsitele). The budgeted service charges for the current financial year, amounts to R182 033 160, 00.   Property rates are levied on +- 14 500 erven and the amount budgeted for is R23 629 544, 00.

 

The valuation roll came into affect on 1 July 2003 and has been compiled to include all property in the area of jurisdiction of Greater Tzaneen Municipality.   This has enhanced the Municipalities revenue sources in the sense that all Agricultural and non proclaimed villages will form part of the revenue stream.   It is however envisage that agricultural land will only be tax from 01 July 2006.

 

5.                    Objectives

 

During the performance management process Greater Tzaneen Municipality identified the following objectives to comply with the requirements of the Constitution:

 

·                                 Apply innovative systems to retain existing customers;

·                                 Promote community based problem solving;

·                                 Improve service delivery in a sustainable manner;

·                                 Enhance economic development through funding and partnerships;

·                                 Optimally leverage capital investment and utilization; and

·                                 Increase financial viability.

 

The following will also receive special attention during the 2005/2006 financial year:

 

·                                 Youth gender and the disabled

·                                 Strengthening of Ward Committees

·                                 Strengthening of partnerships with private sector

·                                 Intergovernmental relations

·                                 Job creation

 

6.                    S.W.O.T Analyses

 

Strength points

 

·                     The Greater Tzaneen Municipality consists of 3240sq.km with a possible tax base of 93000 households.

·                     The Greater Tzaneen Municipality is the second largest Municipality in the Limpopo Province with regard to the provision of electricity, which is the highest source of revenue.

·                     The Greater Tzaneen Municipality is the largest municipality in the Mopani District Municipality area.

·                     The Greater Tzaneen Municipality does have good infrastructure in certain areas.

·                     The Greater Tzaneen Municipality has a workforce which is properly trained and competent to render services to the community.

·                     The Greater Tzaneen Municipality has the capacity to implement projects identified in the IDP process, in order to provide basic services.

·                     The Greater Tzaneen Municipality has a good understanding of the backlog in services rendered to the community as well as the need for services by the community.

·                     The Greater Tzaneen Municipality has an excellent financial system in place to make payments to suppliers timely.

·                     The Greater Tzaneen Municipality has a good credit rating with financial institutions, which put the Council in a good position to borrow funds.

·                     The Greater Tzaneen Municipality manages its financial affairs conservative with a strict monetary policy to ensure that departments stick within their budgets.

·                     The Greater Tzaneen Municipality has a Credit Control and Debt Collection policy in place to deal with arrear debts.

·                     The Greater Tzaneen Municipality has and Economic Development Strategy aligned to the Provincial Growth Development Strategy.

 

 

Weaknesses

 

·                     The Greater Tzaneen Municipality is confronted with poor service rendering by previous governmental institutions, leaving the perception with the community that the Greater Tzaneen Municipality will not live up to their expectations.

·                     The Greater Tzaneen Municipality does not have a call center in place to address all calls made by members of the public.

·                     Response times on enquiries are not up to standard.

·                     The Greater Tzaneen Municipality has decided not to charge every household rates and taxes.

·                     Communication to customers through a customer care system is not in place.

·                     A proper financial reporting system acceptable to financial institutions is not in place.

·                     The Greater Tzaneen Municipality invests in infrastructure without proper cost recovery systems.

·                     The Greater Tzaneen Municipality does not have a proper marketing strategy in place.

 

Opportunities

 

·                     The Greater Tzaneen Municipality can change perceptions from the public by introducing good service rendering.

·                     The Greater Tzaneen Municipality can include all households in the tax base to contribute towards the revenue of Council.

·                     The Greater Tzaneen Municipality has the ability to compile the necessary policies and procedures to address the Batho Pele principles.

·                     Implement a good communication strategy and policy, to the public.

·                     The Greater Tzaneen Municipality has the ability to extend its internal support services to other municipalities, in order to generate more revenue.

·                     The Greater Tzaneen Municipality can obtain political direction in the development of infrastructure services for communities.

·                     The Greater Tzaneen Municipality has the opportunity to render economical sustainable services by introducing effective cost recovery systems.

·                     The Greater Tzaneen Municipality can include all properties in the valuation roll for property tax purposes.

·                     The Greater Tzaneen Municipality can introduce incentive schemes to new prospect investors to create more job opportunities.

·                     The Greater Tzaneen Municipality can stimulate the local economy by the implementation of a new procurement policy that will target local ABE businesses.

·                     The Greater Tzaneen Municipality can improve its financial viability by implementing best practices standards and norms.

 

Threats

 

·                     The Greater Tzaneen Municipality will not be able to render sustainable services if cost recovery is not introduced to all users of services.

·                     The Greater Tzaneen Municipality might loose its credit rating with financial institutions.

·                     The Greater Tzaneen Municipality might not be able to honor its obligations with creditors.

·                     Lack of clarity regarding legislation on the taxation of Traditional Land.

·                     Insecure revenue in the rural villages and tribal land.

·                     The devolution of Powers and Functions to the Mopani District Municipality.

 

 

 

7.                    Financial Strategies

 

Revenue Raising Strategy

 

Valuation Roll

A new valuation roll will be compiled during the 2005/2006 financial year which will include all properties within the area of jurisdiction of Greater Tzaneen Municipality.   A policy which will guide the levying of assessment rates will also be drafted and submitted for approval to comply with the requirements of the Property Rates Act.

 

Credit Control and Debit Collection

A Credit Control Policy and Credit Control By-Law have been drafted and approved by Council.   This Policy and By-Law will be communicated to all communities and all misconception with regard to the payment of services will be clarified.

 

Debit Moratorium

All agreements with regard to the Debt moratorium which are still in place will be honored and communicated to the communities.

 

6.1                 Cash flow

 

Financial reports will be generated and distributed to Managers on a monthly basis to ensure that Managers not only keep expenditure within the limitations of the budget but also less that the revenue received.   Strict financial control will be maintained throughout the financial year.

 

6.2                 Capital

 

The allocation of funds for the 2007/2008 Capital projects have been set as follows:

Source of funding                                                                    Amount

 

Own Sources                                                                           R15 000 000

MIG                                                                                         R16 805 079.52

Capital Projects                                                                       R31805079.52

 

8.                    Financial Viability

 

The financial viability of the Greater Tzaneen Municipality lies in its ability to render services to the community.   The viability principles were placed in jeopardy by the MEC in the decision to transfer certain powers and functions to the Mopani District Municipality and Limpopo Province.

 

In order for the Greater Tzaneen Municipality to improve and sustain financial viability it is important that proper benchmarking and best practices be put in place to achieve the financial goals and objectives of Council.

 

Best Practices

The following best practices are being implemented:

 

-                      Compliance with all financial legislation, regulations and policies;

-                      Implementation of Code of conduct for employees;

-                      Compliance with GAMAP statements and accounting principles set by the Accounting Standard Board

 

Benchmark Ratios

 

The following table indicates the benchmark ratios that are being set to ensure financial viability:

 

 

Ratio Description

Measure

Ratio

 

 

 

Long-term Debt/Income

%

20.76

Debtors/Income

%

34.3

Net debtors/Income

%

12.46

Debtors Days

Days

 

Personnel to total Expenditure

%

25.06

Debt Servicing Costs to total Expenditure

%

0.09

Creditors Days

Days

30

Current ratio

Fraction

1.08 to 1

Distribution Losses

 

 

Electricity (estimated)

%

11

                 Water

%

15

Maintenance cost to total Expenditure

%

16.9

Expenditure per Capita

Rand

2113

 

 

 

 


 

Reporting on benchmark ratios will be done monthly, and compared to Historical ratios.

 

2004

2003

2002

2001

2000

1999

1998

Debt To Assets

18.04%

13.33%

8.29%

9.99%

12.73%

14.13%

15.65%

Interest paid on debt

20.90%

12.46%

21.78%

21.43%

21.29%

22.56%

17.82%

Interest paid as % of Opex

4.21%

2.75%

2.89%

3.70%

4.69%

6.09%

5.49%

Long term Debt to Income

20.77%

20.99%

12.70%

17.60%

 

 

 

Current Ratio

1.08:1

1.4:1

1.9:1

1.1:1

2.5:1

2.6:1

1.5:1

Acid Test Ratio

1.02:1

1.4:1

1.8:1

1:01

2.1:1

2.3:1

1.3:1

Debtor to Income

34.33%

47.75%

45.40%

 

 

 

 

Return on Capital Invested

1.27%

3.13%

2.88%

-1.15%

0.33%

3.17%

1.15%

Assets Turnover

60.51%

63.54%

65.25%

56.75%

58.18%

55.55%

51.96%

Debt Coverage

 

1814.42%

1729.17%